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My Sister

My Sister

My Sister

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My Sister

Joanna Young

New Frontier, 2018

32pp., hbk., RRP $A24.99

9781925594041

Who knows you the best, laughs at your jokes and keeps your secrets safe?  Your sister!

This softly illustrated book for very young readers celebrates the special bond that exists between sisters, perhaps to remind them that even when sibling rivalry rears its head, there is still no one closer to you that your sister.

Growing up the only girl in the middle of eight boisterous boys (one brother, seven cousins) sometimes it would have been nice to have had a sister to confide in, particularly if the bond between them is as strong as sisters say.  This is a gentle book about counting your blessings because there really is nothing stronger than the bonds between a family. 

 

The Dream Bird

The Dream Bird

The Dream Bird

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Dream Bird

Aleesah Darlison

Emma Middleton

Wombat Books, 2018

32pp., hbk., RRP $A19.99

9781925563337

George was a day child – he loved to run and play in the sunshine and light.  But it was a different story at night time when it was time to snuggle down and sleep.  No matter what he did, he could not sleep.  Even following the suggestions of his family like counting 100 sheep backwards and drinking hot milk did not work. 

Deciding to try something new, he crept into Gran’s room but her bed is cold without her cuddles to make it cosy.  But as he slips forlornly to the floor, she slips into the room and tells him a story about a magical bird that will help him sleep and have the nicest of dreams…

This is a most intriguing story, one that has many layers.  Certainly, on the surface, it celebrates the power of the bedtime story as an essential part of the nighttime routine and it also opens up discussions about the importance of sleep and the ways we can help ourselves drift off.  But what is Grandma’s secret?  Is she alive?  Did she die in her sleep making George scared that that will happen to him?  Is it her “ghost” telling the story of the Dream Bird?  

The contrast in the illustrations between George the day child and George the night child using the softest palette and increasingly ethereal lines, the transition between the two parts of the story is perfect, and even though Grandma is the youngest looking grandma on the planet (probably appropriate given George’s age), it all goes towards making this another Darlinson delight that will entertain as much as it intrigues. 

The Little Mermaid

The Little Mermaid

The Little Mermaid

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Little Mermaid

Alex Field

Owen Swan

New Frontier, 2018

32pp., hbk., RRP $A24.99

9781925059816

In 1837, Hans Christian Andersen gave the world his classic story of Ariel, the little mermaid who falls in love with a human prince and in exchange for legs so she can walk on earth with him, she gives up her voice. It is very much a tale of “Be careful what you wish for.”

Retold many times and in many formats, probably the most-well-known version being that of Disney, this is a new retelling that goes back to the original without all the “trimmings”.  For younger readers who are emerging as independent readers, it is retold simply in a straight-forward manner with beautiful new illustrations in water colour and coloured pencils. 

While teachers’ notes are available, it could be used as one of a number of versions of this story to compare and contrast additions, alterations and omissions that the various retellers have chosen to make.  

Others in this series include The Ugly Duckling, The Princess and the Pea, Little Red Riding Hood and Beauty and the Beast.

Bear and Duck (series)

Bear and Duck (series)

Bear and Duck (series)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Goodnight Already!

9780008101343

I Love You Already

9780008165994

Come Home Already

9780008276850

Jory John

Benji Davies

HarperCollins, 2018

32pp., hbk., RRP $A24.99

Bear and Duck are neighbours – but two more different would be hard to find.  Bear is huge, slow and somewhat grouchy; Duck small, energetic and always looking for fun. Told in dialogue with each character having their own font that cleverly echoes their nature, each story focuses on a conflict between the two as Bear wants one thing – usually a quiet life – while Duck wants the opposite.

In Goodnight Already! Bear is ready to settle into bed with his pink fluffy bunny ready for his annual hibernation through the winter months while Duck wants to be up and doing; in I Love You Already Bear is set for a relaxing day but Duck wants him to prove his love; while in Come Home Already, when Bear decides to go fishing for a week Duck is lost without him so he finally decides to go fishing too…

Using a familiar dichotomy of unlikely characters forming close friendships regardless of their differences, this is a charming series that will delight preschoolers who will enjoy the humour and which will resonate with their parents who will see themselves as Bear just wanting a little respite from the untiring, unceasing energy of their “Duck”.

 

The Last Peach

The Last Peach

The Last Peach

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Last Peach

Gus Gordon

Viking, 2018

32pp., hbk., RRP $A24.99

9780670078912

As summer draws to a close, a delicious golden peach hangs in front of the two bugs, tantalising them with its perfection.   But which of them should eat it?  Indeed, should it be eaten at all? Should it remain beautiful and perfect or should they satisfy their hunger?

Discussing the problem and examining the pros and cons, the story is told entirely in dialogue and illustrated using mixed media, particularly paper collage, making the pictures as diverse as the bugs’ dilemma.  

It is ideal for encouraging students how to look at the many sides of a situation because even the simplest set of circumstances can have many perspectives and possible solutions, and perhaps even examining motive and bias,  Does the bug that tells them it’s probably “all stinky and rotten on the inside” covet it for himself? 

This is an intriguing read with a most unexpected outcome that will encourage lots of discussion and debate. 

 

Juniper Jupiter

Juniper Jupiter

Juniper Jupiter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Juniper Jupiter

Lizzy Stewart

Lincoln Children’s, 2018

40pp., hbk., RRP $A24.99

9781786030238

 

Juniper Jupiter is a super-hero – she’s super-kind, super-brave, super-fast, super-sneaky, super strong and she’s super-super-smart.  She has a stunning red cape and she can fly!  But it’s no big deal – isn’t that what all kids do?  But being a super-hero can be lonely sometimes and so. with a list of requirements in hand,  she goes in search of a side-kick …

This is a boldly illustrated fun read for young readers that has a regular, unassuming girl as its hero, one capable of solving her own problems and those of others, yet one who still needs a mate, as we all do.  A light-hearted read that puts a twist on finding friendship.   

Sandcastle

Sandcastle

Sandcastle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sandcastle

Philip Bunting

Allen & Unwin, 2018

32pp., hbk., RRP $A24.99

9781760295387

Rae loves the beach and wants to build a sandcastle, one of those magnificent ones you see in books with towers, ramparts, a moat and even a dragon to guard it!  With the help of his grandfather, he does just that. But while they eat their fish and chips, the inexorable tide moves closer and closer and Rae is worried that the fortifications will not be enough to keep out the sea.  Sadly, they don’t but Rae learns an amazing lesson about the nature of things…

In the author’s dedication he says, “You, me, this book, your breakfast…we’re all made from tiny particles, stuff that has been around since the beginning of time.  We’re only borrowing these particles from the enormous universe that made them.  Once we’re done with them, the bits that make us will go on to lead many new existences on Earth, and beyond.” So while, on the surface, this could be just a pleasant story about a boy and his grandfather at the beach doing something and experiencing the consequences that so many young readers will resonate with, it could also be an introduction to lessons about matter and atoms and stuff, another one of those topics that little ones find tricky to understand because they can’t see the individual components.

But for me, I found beauty in the words as a way of helping a child cope with the grief of losing a family member or pet – that no matter how a disease might have crept through their body and ultimately stolen it, as the sea does a sandcastle, the person still exists as memories and that a little part of them lives on in each person they touched and influenced in some way.  Very philosophical for so early in the morning but a mark of a quality storyteller whose work can touch the reader in many, often unintended, ways.

Eric Makes A Splash

Eric Makes A Splash

Eric Makes A Splash

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eric Makes A Splash

Emily Mackenzie

Bloomsbury, 2018

32pp., pbk., RRP $A14.99

9781408882962

Nothing worried Eric more than trying new things, but luckily he had a brave and kind friend who loved to help him be brave too.  On Monday when Eric was afraid to splash in the muddy puddles Flora suggested he pretends to be a hippo having a bath or a piglet rolling in the mud and soon they were splishing and sploshing together.  On Tuesday she suggested be be a bear so he would have the courage to taste honey sandwiches…  And so it goes on until they receive an invitation to a swimming party.  Eric finally gets his brave on all by himself, but it is Flora who has an attack of the unsures…

This is a new twist on a familiar theme that little ones will love and which parents will appreciate as it offers some new strategies to get timid toddlers to take that first step. Young readers could put themselves into Flora’s shoes and suggest how their friends might overcome a fear in a way that makes it fun. They might even discover that some of the things they are afraid of are common and work out strategies together..

Something a little different.

 

Piggy: Let’s Be Friends!

Piggy: Let's Be Friends!

Piggy: Let’s Be Friends!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Piggy: Let’s Be Friends!

Trevor Lai

Bloomsbury, 2018

32pp., hbk., RRP $A19.99

9781681190686

Piggy loves reading books, having tea parties, and most of all, making new friends! One day he sees a little mole across his garden. Before Piggy can get to know him, the mole hides underground. 

Miles loves reading books and baking cakes, and he would love to have a friend! But the world above makes him so nervous that every time he goes above ground he sneezes. One day they spot each other but before Piggy can find out more, Miles disappears back underground.  Can they find a way to get together?

This is a picture book that little people will love for its bold, bright characters (especially Piggy’s enormous glasses) and its gentle message that friends can be found anywhere no matter how different or shy we might be.  Piggy knows this because initially, in Lai’s first book about him,  he spent all his time reading and was too busy to meet others, but discovered the joy of friendship when he decided to save his very last book and took a kite outside. 

A fresh story about a familiar topic that will appeal to very young readers.

Bird Builds a Nest

Bird Builds a Nest

Bird Builds a Nest

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bird Builds a Nest

Martin Jenkins

Richard Jones

Walker Books, 2018

32pp., hbk., RRP $A24.99

9781406355130

It’s time for Bird to build a nest, but before she can begin she needs to find some food to give her the energy for the hard work ahead.  But the first worm she finds is very large and juicy, and no matter how hard she pulls, she is not strong enough to pull it from the ground because it is pulling back.  When she finally does get something in her tummy, she sets off to look for twigs – but some are too heavy or too long and she can’t carry them.  

And so the story continues until her nest is built with successes and failures as she goes – and each one explained in simple language to teach young readers the very basics of the physics of forces. Physics is a hard topic to understand because so much of it is invisible and requires the sort of abstract thinking that little ones are not able to do readily, so starting with a context such as this and using simple language is a brilliant idea.  The story is followed by an experiment using ping pong balls and modelling clay but no explanation is given to clarify the results.  

While the illustrations mirror the text to provide a greater understanding, they are in a muted, retro palette that may not catch the eye or interest of young readers.  Nevertheless, it’s worth sharing as part of the early childhood STEM curriculum simply because it makes the tricky concepts of force and pushing and pulling so explicit.  However, it might be worth having some props on hand so the children can try things for themselves as they learn that size and weight do matter. 

This is a companion to Fox in the Night which examines the phenomenon of light.  Putting physics into the everyday world of the young reader through stories about common events is a wonderful way to pique and satisfy their curiosity, encourage them to explore further and ask more questions and seek their answers. 

While not directly related to this book, there are several video clips available that will help explain the concepts as well as TLF resources  R10729 and L7879 available via Scootle